Ground School Modules

Private Pilot

Private pilot aeronautical knowledge requirements

§ 61.105 Aeronautical knowledge.

(a)General. A person who is applying for a private pilot certificate must receive and log ground training from anauthorized instructor or complete a home-study course on the aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

(b)Aeronautical knowledge areas.

(1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to private pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations;

(2) Accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board;

(3) Use of the applicable portions of the “Aeronautical Information Manual” and FAA advisory circulars;

(4) Use of aeronautical charts for VFR navigation using pilotage, dead reckoning, and navigation systems;

(5) Radio communication procedures;

(6) Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance, and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts;

(7) Safe and efficient operation of aircraft, including collision avoidance, and recognition and avoidance of wake turbulence;

(8) Effects of density altitude on takeoff and climb performance;

(9) Weight and balance computations;

(10) Principles of aerodynamics, powerplants, and aircraftsystems;

(11) Stall awareness, spin entry, spins, and spin recovery techniques for the airplane and glider category ratings;

(12) Aeronautical decision making and judgment; and

(13) Preflight action that includes –

(i) How to obtain information on runway lengths at airports of intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts, and fuel requirements; and

(ii) How to plan for alternatives if the planned flight cannot be completed or delays are encountered.

[Doc. No. 25910, 62 FR 16298, Apr. 4, 1997; Amdt. 61-103, 62 FR 40902, July 30, 1997]

Instrument Pilot

Welcome to the FAA approved instrument pilot ground school BLOG. The following text and videos will meet all the requirements in the Federal Aviation Regulations for FAA ground school meeting the aeronautical knowledge requirements for the instrument pilot rating. If you require one-on-one tutoring or would like to join our live ground school, Please email us at kienothomas@gmail.com. Thank you for visiting our site.

Instrument Rating Requirements

§ 61.65 Instrument rating requirements.

(a)General. A person who applies for an instrument rating must:

(1) Hold at least a current private pilot certificate, or be concurrently applying for a private pilot certificate, with anairplane, helicopter, or powered-lift rating appropriate to theinstrument rating sought;

(2) Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language. If the applicant is unable to meet any of these requirements due to a medical condition, the Administrator may place such operating limitations on the applicant’s pilot certificate as are necessary for the safe operation of the aircraft;

(3) Receive and log ground training from an authorized instructor or accomplish a home-study course of training on the aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the instrument rating sought;

(4) Receive a logbook or training record endorsement from anauthorized instructor certifying that the person is prepared to take the required knowledge test;

(5) Receive and log training on the areas of operation ofparagraph (c) of this section from an authorized instructor in anaircraft, full flight simulator, or flight training device that represents an airplane, helicopter, or powered-lift appropriate to the instrument rating sought;

(6) Receive a logbook or training record endorsement from anauthorized instructor certifying that the person is prepared to take the required practical test;

(7) Pass the required knowledge test on the aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section; however, an applicant is not required to take another knowledge test when that person already holds an instrument rating; and

(8) Pass the required practical test on the areas of operation inparagraph (c) of this section in –

(i) An airplane, helicopter, or powered-lift appropriate to therating sought; or

(ii) A full flight simulator or a flight training deviceappropriate to the rating sought and for the specific maneuver or instrument approach procedure performed. If an approvedflight training device is used for the practical test, theinstrument approach procedures conducted in that flight training device are limited to one precision and one nonprecision approach, provided the flight training device is approved for the procedure performed.

(b)Aeronautical knowledge. A person who applies for aninstrument rating must have received and logged ground trainingfrom an authorized instructor or accomplished a home-study course on the following aeronautical knowledge areas that apply to the instrument rating sought:

(1) Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that apply to flight operations under IFR;

(2) Appropriate information that applies to flight operations under IFR in the “Aeronautical Information Manual;”

(3) Air traffic control system and procedures for instrumentflight operations;

(4) IFR navigation and approaches by use of navigation systems;

(5) Use of IFR en route and instrument approach procedurecharts;

(6) Procurement and use of aviation weather reports and forecasts and the elements of forecasting weather trends based on that information and personal observation of weather conditions;

(7) Safe and efficient operation of aircraft under instrumentflight rules and conditions;

(8) Recognition of critical weather situations and windshear avoidance;

(9) Aeronautical decision making and judgment; and

(10) Crew resource management, including crew communication and coordination.

(c)Flight proficiency. A person who applies for an instrumentrating must receive and log training from an authorized instructorin an aircraft, or in a full flight simulator or flight training device, in accordance with paragraph (g) of this section, that includes the following areas of operation:

(1) Preflight preparation;

(2) Preflight procedures;

(3) Air traffic control clearances and procedures;

(4) Flight by reference to instruments;

(5) Navigation systems;

(6) Instrument approach procedures;

(7) Emergency operations; and

(8) Postflight procedures.

(d)Aeronautical experience for the instrument-airplane rating. A person who applies for an instrument-airplane ratingmust have logged:

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command, of which 10 hours must have been in an airplane; and

(2) Forty hours of actual or simulated instrument time in the areas of operation listed in paragraph (c) of this section, of which 15 hours must have been received from an authorized instructor who holds an instrument-airplane rating, and theinstrument time includes:

(i) Three hours of instrument flight training from anauthorized instructor in an airplane that is appropriate to theinstrument-airplane rating within 2 calendar months before the date of the practical test; and

(ii) Instrument flight training on cross country flight procedures, including one cross country flight in an airplanewith an authorized instructor, that is performed underinstrument flight rules, when a flight plan has been filed with an air traffic control facility, and that involves –

(A) A flight of 250 nautical miles along airways or by directed routing from an air traffic control facility;

(B) An instrument approach at each airport; and

(C) Three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.

(e)Aeronautical experience for the instrument-helicopter rating. A person who applies for an instrument-helicopter ratingmust have logged:

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command, of which 10 hours must have been in a helicopter; and

(2) Forty hours of actual or simulated instrument time in the areas of operation listed under paragraph (c) of this section, of which 15 hours must have been with an authorized instructorwho holds an instrument-helicopter rating, and the instrumenttime includes:

(i) Three hours of instrument flight training from anauthorized instructor in a helicopter that is appropriate to theinstrument-helicopter rating within 2 calendar months before the date of the practical test; and

(ii) Instrument flight training on cross country flight procedures, including one cross country flight in a helicopterwith an authorized instructor that is performed underinstrument flight rules and a flight plan has been filed with anair traffic control facility, and involves –

(A) A flight of 100 nautical miles along airways or by directed routing from an air traffic control facility;

(B) An instrument approach at each airport; and

(C) Three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.

(f)Aeronautical experience for the instrument-powered-lift rating. A person who applies for an instrument-powered-lift ratingmust have logged:

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command, of which 10 hours must have been in a powered-lift; and

(2) Forty hours of actual or simulated instrument time in the areas of operation listed under paragraph (c) of this section, of which 15 hours must have been received from an authorized instructor who holds an instrument-powered-lift rating, and theinstrument time includes:

(i) Three hours of instrument flight training from anauthorized instructor in a powered-lift that is appropriate to the instrument-powered-lift rating within 2 calendar months before the date of the practical test; and

(ii) Instrument flight training on cross country flight procedures, including one cross country flight in a powered-liftwith an authorized instructor that is performed underinstrument flight rules, when a flight plan has been filed with an air traffic control facility, that involves –

(A) A flight of 250 nautical miles along airways or by directed routing from an air traffic control facility;

(B) An instrument approach at each airport; and

(C) Three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.

(g) An applicant for a combined private pilot certificate with aninstrument rating may satisfy the cross-country flight timerequirements of this section by crediting:

(1) For an instrument-airplane rating or an instrument-powered-lift rating, up to 45 hours of cross-country flight timeperforming the duties of pilot in command with an authorized instructor; or

(2) For an instrument-helicopter rating, up to 47 hours of cross-country flight time performing the duties of pilot in commandwith an authorized instructor.

(h)Use of full flight simulators or flight training devices. If the instrument time was provided by an authorized instructor in afull flight simulator or flight training device

(1) A maximum of 30 hours may be performed in that full flight simulator or flight training device if the instrument time was completed in accordance with part 142 of this chapter; or

(2) A maximum of 20 hours may be performed in that full flight simulator or flight training device if the instrument time was not completed in accordance with part 142 of this chapter.

(i)Use of an aviation training device. A maximum of 10 hours of instrument time received in a basic aviation training device or a maximum of 20 hours of instrument time received in an advanced aviation training device may be credited for the instrument time requirements of this section if –

(1) The device is approved and authorized by the FAA;

(2) An authorized instructor provides the instrument time in the device; and

(3) The FAA approved the instrument training and instrumenttasks performed in the device.

(j) Except as provided in paragraph (h)(1) of this section, aperson may not credit more than 20 total hours of instrumenttime in a full flight simulator, flight training device, aviation training device, or a combination towards the instrument time requirements of this section.

[Doc. No. 25910, 62 FR 16298, Apr. 4, 1997; Amdt. 61-103, 62 FR 40900, July 30, 1997; Amdt. 61-124, 74 FR 42554, Aug. 21, 2009; Amdt. 61-127, 76 FR 19267, Apr. 7, 2011; Amdt. 61-128,76 FR 54106, Aug. 31, 2011; Docket FAA-2015-1846, Amdt. 61-136, 81 FR 21460, Apr. 12, 2016]

Instrument Ground school Module 1

Instrument Ground School Module 2

Next video

 

Commercial Pilot

Aeronautical knowledge requirements

§ 61.125 Aeronautical knowledge.

(a)General. A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and log ground training from anauthorized instructor, or complete a home-study course, on the aeronautical knowledge areas of paragraph (b) of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

(b)Aeronautical knowledge areas.

(1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to commercial pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations;

(2) Accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board;

(3) Basic aerodynamics and the principles of flight;

(4) Meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations, windshear recognition and avoidance, and the use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts;

(5) Safe and efficient operation of aircraft;

(6) Weight and balance computations;

(7) Use of performance charts;

(8) Significance and effects of exceeding aircraft performance limitations;

(9) Use of aeronautical charts and a magnetic compass forpilotage and dead reckoning;

(10) Use of air navigation facilities;

(11) Aeronautical decision making and judgment;

(12) Principles and functions of aircraft systems;

(13) Maneuvers, procedures, and emergency operations appropriate to the aircraft;

(14) Night and high-altitude operations;

(15) Procedures for operating within the National Airspace System; and

(16) Procedures for flight and ground training for lighter-than-air ratings.

Airline Transport Pilot

Aeronautical knowledge requirements

§ 61.155 Aeronautical knowledge.

(a)General. The knowledge test for an airline transport pilot certificate is based on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in paragraph (c) of this section that are appropriate to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

(b)Aircraft type rating. A person who is applying for an additional aircraft type rating to be added to an airline transport pilot certificate is not required to pass a knowledge test if thatperson‘s airline transport pilot certificate lists the aircraft category and class rating that is appropriate to the type rating sought.

(c)Aeronautical knowledge areas.

(1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to airline transport pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations;

(2) Meteorology, including knowledge of and effects of fronts, frontal characteristics, cloud formations, icing, and upper-air data;

(3) General system of weather and NOTAM collection, dissemination, interpretation, and use;

(4) Interpretation and use of weather charts, maps, forecasts, sequence reports, abbreviations, and symbols;

(5) National Weather Service functions as they pertain to operations in the National Airspace System;

(6) Windshear and microburst awareness, identification, and avoidance;

(7) Principles of air navigation under instrument meteorological conditions in the National Airspace System;

(8) Air traffic control procedures and pilot responsibilities as they relate to en route operations, terminal area and radar operations, and instrument departure and approach procedures;

(9) Aircraft loading, weight and balance, use of charts, graphs, tables, formulas, and computations, and their effect on aircraftperformance;

(10) Aerodynamics relating to an aircraft‘s flight characteristics and performance in normal and abnormal flight regimes;

(11) Human factors;

(12) Aeronautical decision making and judgment;

(13) Crew resource management to include crew communication and coordination; and

(14) After July 31, 2014, for airplane category multiengine classrating or airplane type rating, the content of the airline transport pilot certification training program in § 61.156.

(d) An applicant who successfully completes the knowledge testfor an airline transport pilot certificate prior to August 1, 2014, must successfully complete the practical test within 24 months from the month in which the knowledge test was successfully completed. An applicant who passes the knowledge test prior to August 1, 2014, but fails to successfully complete the airplanecategory with a multiengine class rating practical test within 24 months must complete the airline transport pilot certification training program specified in § 61.156 and retake the knowledge test prior to applying for the airplane category with a multiengine class rating practical test.

[Doc. No. 25910, 62 FR 16298, Apr. 4, 1997, as amended by Amdt. 61-130, 78 FR 42374, July 15, 2013; Docket FAA-2010-0100, Amdt. 61-130C, 81 FR 2, Jan. 4, 2016]
Airline Transport Pilot Videos
Briefing Video
Simulator Video
Start up and taxi
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Fga1evl2Yo
Take off and cruise
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSO-M3VFFFA
Approach landing and shut down
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xGUIgd9xSo

Aviation Ground School Instructor Basic

 

Aviation Ground School Instructor Advanced

 

Aviation Ground School Instructor Instrument

 

CFI (Ceritified Flight Instructor) Initial

 

CFI (Ceritified Flight Instructor) Instrument

 

CFI (Ceritified Flight Instructor) Multi-engine